"The Bed"
"The Bed"

Instead of using real mattresses, futon beds were used. They were easier to store in the theatre, cheaper, and worked perfectly with the feel of the show. Mix matched sheets and blankets covered them to complete the look.

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Gasoline Fuel
Gasoline Fuel
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Set Dressing
Set Dressing
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Armed Forces Banner
Armed Forces Banner

This was used to indicate the protesting outside of the Examining and Induction Station.

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Protesting posters
Protesting posters
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Set Dressing
Set Dressing

Fishing bobbins were painted in blues and were attached to ribbons hanging from the dream catcher in order to add more volume and color.

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Ribbons were hand dyed to match the designers rendering.

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Designer's Model Box
Designer's Model Box
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"Be In" Flyers
"Be In" Flyers

During each show 45 flyers were handed out to audience members. These were samples, but in the end we chose the top left. They were printed in six different colors.

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Hair was my first production as a props master and was a valuable learning experience.

Working with a props list of 50 hand props, 150 total paper props, and 240 consumable props, I was given a budget of $180.  I was able to pull and build the majority of the props from Penn State's prop shop.  I did manage to come in on budget by researching and testing the best ways to make the consumable props and paper props.  

The big purchases were the materials used for the "stage joints" which consisted of sage and mint.  240 joints were used throughout the whole run of the shows. Also providing lighter fluid and flints for the six zippos on stage was a reoccurring purchase.

 

Paper props and small hand props made up the majority of the props.  Because this show is a period show, all paper props had to be accurate.  The draft notices, draft cards, and newspapers were all researched in order to ensure they were correct to the winter of 1969.  

 

The largest prop was the Lady Liberty hand.  This prop was nearly 5 feet tall and 3 feet wide.  It was on wheels and had fake flames attached to the front to hide the character Jeanie during the song "Air".

 

During the 8 weeks of production I had 4 running lists.  A detailed prop list, a narrowed down prop list, a prop list for the assistant stage manager with detailed notes of changes and how the prop was able to be used, and a calendar to make sure the prop shop was staying on track with the props.  I also had two research binders, one that remained in the shop with the updated lists for the props artists to see each day and one that remained with me at all times.  

 

During this time I was spending a minimum of 20 hours a week in the shop.

Portfolio for Hair

Properties Master

Hair

Downtown Theatre

The Pennsylvania State University

Scenic Designer: Dominique Coughlin

2016